Adventures in Machine Learning

Golf Scoring for Beginners: Understanding the Conventions and Creating a Golf Scores Program

Golfing is played worldwide and is a sport of precision and skill that has been around for centuries. One of the things that sets golf apart from other sports is the scoring system.

If you are new to golf or wanting to gain a deeper understanding of the scoring conventions in golf, this article is for you.

Golf scoring is one of the easiest systems to follow in all sports, relying on the lowest score to determine the winner.

The lower the score, the better your performance. In simpler terms, whoever completes the golf course with the fewest number of strokes wins.

However, what does this really mean when it comes to scoring a round of golf?

Scoring Conventions in Golf

When scoring a round of golf, you will come across different numbers that refer to the number of strokes required for each hole. The following are the main conventions you need to know.

Stroke

A stroke refers to hitting the ball once. When you swing the club and make contact with the ball, that counts as one stroke.

Par

Par is the number of strokes that a skilled or professional golfer should take to complete a hole. It is the benchmark that amateurs aim to achieve.

If a hole is a par-three, then it should take you three strokes to complete the hole ideally.

Condor

A condor is the rarest score in golf. It refers to completing a hole four under par.

This is possible on par-five holes since there will be more opportunity to make up strokes since you are allowed to hit the ball more times.

Albatross (Double

Eagle)

An albatross refers to completing a hole three under par. If you are lucky enough to achieve this feat, it is truly remarkable.

Eagle

An eagle is completing a hole two under par. This is an excellent score and something to be proud of.

Birdie

A birdie is completing a hole one under par.

Birdies are an essential part of golf and show great skill and precision.

Ace

An ace (or hole-in-one) refers to hitting the ball from the tee and getting it into the hole using the fewest strokes possible. It is one of the best moments any golfer can achieve.

Bogey

A bogey is completing a hole one over par. This means that you took one more stroke to complete the hole than what a skilled or professional golfer would have taken.

Double

Bogey

A double bogey is completing a hole two over par. Triple

Bogey

A triple bogey is completing a hole three over par.

Quadruple

Bogey

A quadruple bogey is completing a hole four over par.

Overview of Golf Scores Program

If you are new to golf, it can be challenging to understand the various terminology used in a golf game and keep up with the scores. To address this challenge, you can use a Golf Scores Program.

It helps players understand the game’s scoring system and keep track of their progress. The Golf Scores Program is straightforward to code and can serve as a beginner’s project to increase familiarity with coding syntax and control flow.

The program uses a text file for storing game data, a main menu to access different functionalities, and various functions to ensure efficient program flow.

Basic Structure of Golf Scores Program

The program’s basic structure includes several components – a main menu, a text file to store data, a program flow structure, and various functions. The main menu allows players to choose different options, view past scores, and input new score data for future reference.

The text file serves as an essential resource for storing game progress and keeping it safe for future reference. The program flow structure ensures efficient use of resources and prevents errors, ensuring the program runs smoothly.

Functions are used within the program to accomplish a wide range of tasks, including accessing the text file, reading the stored data, writing new data, and displaying the results in a manner that is easy to understand.

Conclusion

Understanding the scoring conventions of golf is critical for your success on the course. With this knowledge, you can communicate effectively when talking about your performance, understand how you can improve your game, and even create a Golf Scores Program to keep track of your progress.

Use this article as a guide to help you learn more about golf scoring, and take advantage of the opportunities it provides to take your golf game to a new level. Continuing from the previous section, we will now take a closer look at the program flow and various functions that make up the Golf Scores Program.

This will include a breakdown of the main menu options, functions for creating new records, displaying specific records, and listing all recorded data. We will also provide examples of output data to help you understand how the program works in practice.

Main Menu Options

The Golf Scores Program has four main menu options: New Record, Search Player, Display All Records, and Quit. Here is a brief rundown of what each option does:

1.

New Record: This option allows you to create a new player record by entering their name along with the score and par for each hole as well as the scoring convention – birdie, bogey, ace, etc. 2.

Search Player: This option allows you to search for a particular player’s records by entering their name. Once you have entered the name, the program will display all the recorded data for that player.

3. Display All Records: This option allows you to view all recorded data for all players.

The program will display a list of all players along with their scores and par for each hole. 4.

Quit: This option allows you to exit the program.

Function to Create New Record

The CreateRecord function creates a new player record and saves it to the text file. Here’s how it works:

1.

The function asks for the player’s name and stores it as a string. 2.

It then prompts the user to enter the scores and par for each hole and saves them to variables. 3.

Finally, the function asks for the scoring convention – birdie, bogey, ace, etc., and stores it as a string. 4.

The function then formats the new record as a string and writes it to the text file. Function to Display a

Particular Record

The Display function displays a particular player’s record based on the name entered by the user.

Here’s how it works:

1. The function prompts the user to enter a player’s name.

2. It then searches for the player’s name in the text file and retrieves all the recorded data.

3. Finally, the function formats the data as a string and displays it to the user.

Function to Display All Records

The DisplayAll function displays all the recorded data for all players. Here’s how it works:

1.

The function reads the text file and retrieves all of the recorded data. 2.

It then formats the data as a string and displays it to the user.

Driver Code for Main Menu

The driver code for the main menu is responsible for presenting the user with menu options, getting their input, and executing the selected option. Here’s how it works:

1.

The program initializes a user prompt to select a menu option by printing the available menu options. 2.

It then prompts the user to enter their choice by selecting the corresponding number. 3.

The program checks the user’s input to determine which menu option to execute and calls the corresponding functions, such as CreateRecord, Display, and DisplayAll. 4.

If the user enters an invalid choice, the program will print an error message and loop back to the prompt.

Example Outputs

Here are some examples of output data generated by the program:

Example Output for Creating New Record

Name:

Charlie

Score 6,

Par 3, Triple

Bogey

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 4,

Par 5,

Birdie

Score 5,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 6,

Par 3, Triple

Bogey

Score 3,

Par 5,

Eagle

Score 4,

Par 4,

Par

Score 5,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 3, Double

Bogey

Score 4,

Par 4,

Par

Total Score: 42

Scoring: 3 birdies, 4 pars, 2 bogeys, 1 double bogey, 2 triple bogey

This output shows the scores and par for each hole entered by the user for

Charlie. The total score and scoring convention are displayed as well.

Example Output for Searching Player

Name:

Eva

Score 2,

Par 3,

Birdie

Score 1,

Par 3,

Ace

Score 3,

Par 5,

Eagle

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 4,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 3,

Par 5,

Eagle

Score 4,

Par 3,

Bogey

Score 6,

Par 4, Double

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 3, Double

Bogey

Total Score: 33

Scoring: 4 birdies, 2 pars, 3 bogeys, 2 double bogeys, 1 ace, 2 eagles

This output displays all the recorded data for

Eva. The scores and par for each hole, as well as the total score and scoring convention, are shown.

Example Output for Displaying All Records

Mark

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 4,

Par 4,

Par

Score 5,

Par 5, Double

Bogey

Score 6,

Par 3, Triple

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 7,

Par 5, Double

Bogey

Score 4,

Par 3,

Par

Score 6,

Par 4, Double

Bogey

Total Score: 45

Scoring: 6 birdies, 2 pars, 2 bogeys, 3 double bogeys, 1 triple bogey

Celine

Score 3,

Par 3,

Par

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 5,

Par 4, Double

Bogey

Score 6,

Par 3, Triple

Bogey

Score 4,

Par 5,

Birdie

Score 4,

Par 4,

Par

Score 6,

Par 4, Double

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 3, Double

Bogey

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Total Score: 42

Scoring: 5 birdies, 4 pars, 1 bogey, 3 double bogeys, 1 triple bogey

Eva

Score 2,

Par 3,

Birdie

Score 1,

Par 3,

Ace

Score 3,

Par 5,

Eagle

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 4,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 3,

Par 5,

Eagle

Score 4,

Par 3,

Bogey

Score 6,

Par 4, Double

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 3, Double

Bogey

Total Score: 33

Scoring: 4 birdies, 2 pars, 3 bogeys, 2 double bogeys, 1 ace, 2 eagles

Charlie

Score 6,

Par 3, Triple

Bogey

Score 3,

Par 4,

Birdie

Score 4,

Par 5,

Birdie

Score 5,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 6,

Par 3, Triple

Bogey

Score 3,

Par 5,

Eagle

Score 4,

Par 4,

Par

Score 5,

Par 4,

Bogey

Score 5,

Par 3, Double

Bogey

Score 4,

Par 4,

Par

Total Score: 42

Scoring: 3 birdies, 4 pars, 2 bogeys, 1 double bogey, 2 triple bogey

Scoresforgolf.txt

This output shows all the recorded data for all players, including the player’s name, the scores and par for each hole, the total score, and the scoring conventions for each player. The data is sorted in alphabetical order by player name and is read from the text file, Scoresforgolf.txt.

In conclusion, the importance of the Golf Scores Program for beginners cannot be overstated. The program is a common project used to teach basic Python syntax, logic, and control flow.

It presents an opportunity for beginners to practice coding while learning a topic they are passionate about, helping them to develop both programming and golf skills simultaneously. In addition to the coding benefits, the program highlights the crucial role file management plays in programming.

The ability to read and write files is foundational in most programming languages, and Python is no exception. Proper file management ensures the integrity of program data, preventing loss and corruption while facilitating easy access to stored data.

The Golf Scores Program uses a text file to store player data, demonstrating how Python can read and write files. The program prompts users to input and save data to a file, and the data can be retrieved using Python’s file management functions.

Data is stored in a simple and easy-to-read format that can be quickly understood and navigated. Overall, the Golf Scores Program provides a fun and practical way for beginners to learn Python programming.

The program helps to build foundational programming skills while also teaching the importance of file management, two essential skills in the tech industry. Plus, for avid golfers, it provides an exciting opportunity to explore the scoring conventions of the sport while practicing coding skills.

By building practical projects like this one, beginners can develop their skills more efficiently, grow their confidence, and move on to more advanced projects. In this article, we explored the scoring conventions in golf and how the Golf Scores Program can help beginners understand the scoring system.

We discussed the program’s basic structure, main menu options, and functions used to create new records, search for specific players, and display all recorded data. Additionally, the article highlighted the importance of file management in Python for the Golf Scores Program.

By learning to read and write files, beginners can develop foundational programming skills while building a fun and practical project. Programmers, golf enthusiasts, and those interested in learning or practicing Python should pay attention to this program’s importance.

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